(Click here to login)
MY SHOPPING CART 0 Item(s) in Cart
SEARCH FOR COMICS
TITLE
ISSUE
3rd Party Grdr
BROWSE TITLES BY ALPHABET
# A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
ORDER & PAYMENT INFO
Checks & Money Orders Accepted
How To Order   Shipping/Return Policy Time Payments
COLLECTIONS UPDATE
Metropolis Gallery Art for Sale
May The 4th Be With You @ Metropolis
Greg Hildebrandt A Retrospective
NEW ARRIVALS GALORE! Thousands of new books from the past few months! FEAST YO
RECENT KEYS! First appearances, first issues, origins, etc!
METROPOLIS ESSENTIALS

NEW!!  SUPERHERO MOVIE UPDATES!!
Keep on top of the hottest keys for the latest TV and movie properties!  INVESTMENT KEYS GALORE!  CHECK BACK OFTEN!

 

GROUP LOTS
Good things come in BIG packages! Browse our group lot listings

YOU'VE GOT MAIL
Join the Metropolis Mailing List!

DISCOUNT SECTION
Prices below Guide. Get the most for your collecting budget!

BOOKMARK METROPOLIS
Don't want to forget about this site?

GIFT CERTIFICATES
 Can you think of a better gift?
LINKS & ADS
Metropolis offers both a linkshare program and sponsor advertising.
Find out more!
WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING
"If there is a hard-to-find comic I'm looking for, it eventually shows up at Metropolis."
- Brett B., Kentucky
The Metropolis Survey
Neal Adams: The Marvel Years (Comic Book Artist #3, 1998)
By Arlen Schumer

Superman by Neal Adams In the 1960's, I was a DC Comics fan: the Mort Weisinger Superman line, Julius Schwartz's sci-fi-superheroes, and, of course, Batman ( the debut of the '66 TV series was a seminal event in my childhood). Marvel Comics didn't appeal to me; they seemed too complicated, too busy-looking (too many words!) compared to the somewhat banal simplicity of DC's line.

My brother, though, was a Marvelite and devotee of Jack Kirby. I was a fan of newcomer Neal Adams, who had every DC follower excited by his work on Deadman. We would argue endlessly about who was "better," and daydream about company crossovers, like what if Kirby went to DC and drew Superman, or Adams worked at Marvel. In those days, it was unheard of for any artist to be working for more than one company at a time (we didn't know then that Marvel's new Sub-Mariner artist, Adam Austin, was DC's war artist Gene Colan, or that Marvel's "Mickey Demeo" was a pseudonym for DC's Mike Esposito!). It was a shock when DC stalwart Gil Kane drew a few issues of The Hulk in 1967, but nothing prepared us for that day in 1969 when Neal Adams began drawing The X-Men!

The X-Men? According to my brother, the title had been going downhill ever since Kirby stopped drawing it years earlier, and, save for a few recent issues drawn by the great Jim Steranko and new kid on the block Barry Smith (then a Kirby clone), the title was all but forgotten and destined for discontinuation. Suffice to say, even my diehard brother became an Adams believer because of his breathtaking X-Men work.

Back then, I was too enamored by what Adams was doing at DC with Batman and Green Lantern/Green Arrow to notice what a body of incredible work--in addition to his X-Men--Adams was compiling at Marvel. Doing this interview as a follow-up to my prior "Neal Adams: the DC Years" (Comic Book Marketplace #40, 1996) was an eye-opening experience for a self-styled Adams expert like myself, as revelations of the breadth of his storytelling achievements came to light.

Just as his Batman became the modern standard, influencing Frank Miller years later to do The Dark Knight Returns, which in turn influenced the movie portrayals, making Batman DC's franchise character, so too did Adams' X-Men, with far less fanfare, go on to become the new model of the characters, influencing a new generation of Marvel artists and writers to create their versions of the X-Men based on his, which became the cornerstone of Marvel's hegemony in the '80's (and "spawned" Image's superhero line). So it is not too far a stretch to say that Adams' Batman and X-Men are the twin pillars upon which today's DC and Marvel rest.

Like his contemporary Steranko, Adams' relatively small body of Marvel work stands in direct converse proportion to its enormous influence. So I was not surprised by Neal's answer to my first question, "Why did you go to Marvel Comics?"
 
 
Affiliates:   PopFunk.com   TheXFilesStory.info   Certified Comics   Comic Book Links
Metropolis Collectibles, 36 W 37 St, Fl 6 New York, NY 10018
(USA) 1-800-229-6387, (Int'l) 001-212-260-4147, (FAX) 212-260-4304
EMAIL: [email protected]
Copyright 1996-2017